News & Events

Announcing Slope Editions' 2016 Open Reading Period!

Slope Editions is accepting full-length poetry manuscripts for its 2016 Open Reading Period from August 15th until September 5th. The chosen manuscript will be announced in the fall of 2016 and published in 2017 by Slope Editions. Visit our Submittable page to submit: https://slopeeditions.submittable.com/submit. The poet whose manuscript is chosen will receive 30 copies of their book. We especially encourage submissions from poets of color, women, and LGBTQ poets.

Details and Guidelines:

Eligibility: Any American poet/translator writing in English is eligible, unless that person has a close personal or professional relationship with any Slope Editions staff members. Any manuscript that has appeared or is forthcoming as a printed book, e-book, or chapbook will NOT be considered. We will not be reading these manuscripts blind—no need to remove names or contact information.

Electronic Submission Guidelines: 40 to 90 pages as formatted in standard 8 &½” by 11” MS Word or PDF document submitted through Submittable. Please include a title page with book title, a table of contents, and (if applicable) an acknowledgements page with the manuscript.

Paper Submission Guidelines: We will not accept any paper submissions during this open reading period. If you have extenuating circumstances which prevent digital submission, contact slope.editions@gmail.com.

Entry Fee: $5, paid via Submittable.

Deadline: September 5th, 2016. All deadlines Eastern Standard Time.

Revisions: Slope Editions will only accept minimal edits on the chosen manuscript before publication. No revisions will be considered during the reading period.

Entrants to the Slope Editions Open Reading Period may also be considered for additional Slope Editions publications.  Entrants being considered for these publications will be notified. We offer sincere thanks to all entrants and readers for supporting Slope Editions and small press poetry.

We can't wait to read your work!

Keegan Lester Wins Slope Editions' 15th Annual Book Contest, Selected by Mary Ruefle

We are thrilled to announce the winner of our 15th Annual Book Prize: this shouldn’t be beautiful but it was & it was all I had, so I drew it by Keegan Lester, selected by Mary Ruefle for publication in Spring 2017.

Of the winning manuscript, Ruefle writes, “Falling in love while losing a loved one and watching the war news on TV? Life is difficult, and the poems in this marvelous collection ask a fundamental question: What does it mean to be human? Each poem supplies part of the answer--to go looking, to make mistakes, to be confused, to be wounded, to keep moving toward a new life. “The expression of our faces when we almost get to where we are going”--that is the expression we have while reading this book, which has the pace of an intense, anticipated journey, one that acknowledges that language is a problem, that art, science, and history are problems, but nonetheless many disparate lives, both past and present, somehow meld into one small life lived, and when that life speaks--“mouth deliver us to the present”--we sit up and listen, for the experience of reading has handed us a strange joy.”

We're so excited to bring this book to you!

***

Keegan Lester is a poet splitting time between New York City and Morgantown, West Virginia. His work appears or is forthcoming from: The Boston Review, CutBank, The Journal, Sixth Finch, Boaat and The Atlas Review among others and has been featured on NPR, Coldfront and the New School writing blog. He is the co-founder and poetry editor for the journal Souvenir Lit, and is mentoring high school students for The Adroit Summer Mentorship program.  He tours solo and sometimes with the New York City Poetry brothel and sometimes with the Travelin' Appalachians Revue. He earned his MFA from Columbia University.  

***

We would also like to congratulate our finalists, listed below in no particular order:

 

  • Coolth by Hajara Quinn
  • And And And by C Dylan Bassett
  • you were never seen far from your coat by John Duvernoy
  • There's Something Happening Outside! by Sara Peck
  • small siren by Alexandra Mattaw
  • Inlanders by Jesse Lichtenstein
  • Futurologist by Doug Paul Case
  • Our Pornography & Other Disaster Songs by BJ Soloy
  • Out of Nothing, Through A Brightness, Into Nothing by Jonathan Weinert

Announcing the release of Ben Mirov's ghost machines!

Slope Editions is excited to announce that ghost machines by Ben Mirov will be available for purchase at our table at the 2016 AWP Conference in Los Angeles, CA, as well as on our website starting on March 31st, 2016.

ghost machines, Ben Mirov's third full length book of poetry was chosen as the winner of our 14th Annual Book Prize by Douglas Kearney.

A descendant of Mirov’s previous collections, Collected Ghost (H_NGM_N Books, 2009), and Ghost Machine (Caketrain, 2010), ghost machines utilizes the tools of its predecessors, but in new ways—further blurring the line between poem & examination, poem & specter.

About the collection, Kearney writes, “Reading ghost machines, I am reminded of Brian Eno and David Byrne’s My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, J Dilla’s Donuts, or DJ Shadow’s Endtroducing.... In these sonic works, archives reanimate into loop driven compositions that stave off endings. Refrain riddles these poems, deepening echoes that re-orient and destabilize. “A frozen lung tree”—a persistently repeated phrase, is an anatomical metaphor, an abstracted image of networks, part of a grotesque arbor—but in all cases, unable to provide air, the tree’s vital fruit. Yet, these poems refuse stasis, the repetitions shuffle in interval, adding new fragments from Rilke, Pound, Borges, and a video gaming manual, gently accumulating new possibilities."

Mirov is the author of Hider Roser (Octopus Books, 2012), and Ghost Machine (Caketrain, 2010) which was selected for publication by Michael Burkard, and chosen as one of the best books of poetry in 2010 for Believer Magazine's Reader Survey. He is also the author of the chapbooks My Hologram Chamber is Surrounded by Miles of Snow (YESYES, 2011), Vortexts (SUPERMACHINE, 2011), I is to Vorticism (New Michigan Press, 2010), and Collected Ghost (H_NGM_N, 2010). He is a founding editor of PEN America's Poetry Series, and an editor-at-large for LIT Magazine. He grew up in Northern California and lives in Oakland. 

We also want to remind you that submissions for our 15th Annual Book Prize, judged by Mary Ruefle, are still open until April 15th! For more information and to submit, see our submittable page.

We are so excited to be able to share this book with the world!

Announcing the Winner of our Fourth Annual Chapbook Contest!

Slope Editions is pleased to announce the results of our Fourth Annual Chapbook Contest. We will be publishing speech rinse, a chapbook by Vanessa Couto Johnson, in Spring 2016. We are so excited to share this beautiful manuscript with you!

We also want to extend congratulations to our five finalists. We've read so many incredible manuscripts over the past month—thank you for entrusting Slope Editions with your work!

Finalists:

Jennifer Liberts Weinberg's Tender Organs
Sam Corfman's An Opaque Flower Digging
Chris Salerno's We Were All Why
Kylan Rice's Natch
and E. Kristin Anderson's 17 seventeen XVII

Vanessa Couto Johnson’s poems have appeared in Blackbird, Cream City Review, Cobalt Review, The Destroyer, Posit, and Two Serious Ladies, among others. Her first chapbook, Life of Francis, won Gambling the Aisle's 2014 Chapbook Contest, and another chapbook, rotoscoping collage in Cork City, is forthcoming from dancing girl press in fall 2016. She has a BA in English and philosophy from Rice University and can be described as a Brazilian born in Texas (dual citizenship). A two-time Pushcart Prize nominee, she is currently a Lecturer at Texas State University, where she earned her MFA.

 

IT'S BOOK PRIZE TIME -- SLOPE EDITIONS CAN'T WAIT TO READ YOUR SUBMISSION!

Slope Editions is accepting full-length poetry manuscripts for its 14th Annual Slope Editions Book Prize Contest. This year's contest will be judged by Douglas Kearney. The deadline is March 15th. The winning poet will have his/her book of poems published in 2016 by Slope Editions.

Poet/performer/librettist Douglas Kearney’s third poetry collection, Patter (Red Hen Press, 2014) examines miscarriage, infertility, and parenthood. His second, The Black Automaton (Fence Books, 2009), was a National Poetry Series selection. His work has appeared in a number of journals, includingPoetry, nocturnes, Pleiades, The Boston Review, The Iowa Review, Ninth Letter, Washington Square, and Callaloo. He lives with his family in California’s Santa Clarita Valley and teaches at CalArts.

Entrants to the Slope Editions Book Prize may also be considered for additional Slope Editions publications.  Entrants being considered for these publications will be notified. We offer sincere thanks to all entrants and readers for supporting Slope Editions and small press poetry.

Eligibility: Any American poet writing in English is eligible, unless that person has a close personal or professional relationship with the judge and/or Slope Editions staff. Past or current students of the judge are ineligible to enter; entry fees will be returned in these cases. Any manuscript that has appeared or is forthcoming as a printed book, e-book, or chapbook will NOT be considered. Please do not include your name or any personal information anywhere on the manuscript. Manuscripts that are not blinded will not be read.

Submission Formats & Fees:

We are no longer accepting paper submissions.

Electronic ($25): 40 to 90 pages as formatted in standard 8 &1/2 by 11 MS Word or PDF document submitted through Submittable. Your name should not appear anywhere within your manuscript.  Please include a title page with book title only, a table of contents, and an acknowledgements page with manuscript.  $25 entry fee, payable through Submittable, must accompany all submissions.

Submit by March 15th, 2015.

Submissions are entered here: http://slopeeditions.submittable.com/submit

Notification: We do NOT accept notification SASEs or postcards.  Please check the Slope Editions website for announcement of contest winner. Notification SASEs or postcards will NOT be returned.

Revisions: The winner will be able to revise his/her manuscript before publication. No revisions will be considered during the reading period.

“The answer is: Don’t just cog the machine. Hold it under till it casts out the ghost.” —Kit Frick, Echo, Echo, Light, Contest winner, 2013 We are happy to announce the opening of our Third Annual Chapbook Contest! Winner receives $100 + ten free copies! Submissions will be accepted through submittable, slopeeditions.submittable.com; please check there for guidelines & details!  

“The answer is: Don’t just cog the machine.

Hold it under till it casts out the ghost.”

—Kit Frick, Echo, Echo, Light, Contest winner, 2013


We are happy to announce the opening of our Third Annual Chapbook Contest! Winner receives $100 + ten free copies! Submissions will be accepted through submittable, slopeeditions.submittable.com; please check there for guidelines & details!

 

We are so excited to announce that we will be publishing James Schiller’s book of poems YES I UNDERSTAND AND WISH TO CONTINUE in Spring 2015! This is an amazing book—influenced by disintegration loops, witchcraft, and Schiller’s experience of keeping a hive of bees in a glass box in his bedroom as a child.

About this book, Matt Hart said: “If you like eating pipe bombs for breakfast and pissing off your friends, read these poems. If you don’t like those things, read these poems. If you love everyone so much that it actually makes you sick, then definitely read these poems.”

We are thrilled to be able to bring this exciting book in the world!

Attention:

Are you interested in reviewing Monika Zobel’s AN INSTRUMENT FOR LEAVING? If so, contact hanna@slope.org!

"This is the only way to listen
to thunder. I count
backwards, all the way

backwards to lightning—that moment
before knowing, before wanting
when you were still

the only music, unheard of”

—from AN INSTRUMENT FOR LEAVING, by Monika Zobel

Order here

 

The Poetry & Cruelty Hotline, Vol. 8

Listen to a poem from Slope author Kit Frick, author of ECHO, ECHO, LIGHT in the latest installment of The Poetry and Cruelty Hotline.

the sun is out & so is Monika Zobel’s AN INSTRUMENT FOR LEAVING, the winner of our 2013 Book Prize! Here’s what Dorothea Lasky has to say about Zobel’s book: "Zobel’s poetic hauntings here are like the uncanny feeling of a strange bird in the hand, inescapably present, humming to the dark, smuggling us off with her in an odd and beautiful motionless flight." order now—-www.slopeeditions.org

the sun is out & so is Monika Zobel’s AN INSTRUMENT FOR LEAVING, the winner of our 2013 Book Prize! Here’s what Dorothea Lasky has to say about Zobel’s book:

"Zobel’s poetic hauntings here are like the uncanny feeling of a strange bird in the hand, inescapably present, humming to the dark, smuggling us off with her in an odd and beautiful motionless flight."

order now—-www.slopeeditions.org

goatinthesnow: TWO PEOPLE TALKING Hosted by Kelin Loe In the inaugural episode, Dorothea Lasky and Kelin talk about indigo, energy, elephants, blood and guts. Dottie reads poems from her 2nd and 3rd collections, Black Life and Thunderbird. The episode is a collage of their conversations and her poetry. Flying Object Radio

goatinthesnow:

Hosted by Kelin Loe

In the inaugural episode, Dorothea Lasky and Kelin talk about indigo, energy, elephants, blood and guts. Dottie reads poems from her 2nd and 3rd collections, Black Life and Thunderbird. The episode is a collage of their conversations and her poetry.

sean-kilpatrick:

EPISODE 1 – CHEW THE SCALES OFF WHAT PASSED US

Gil is tutoring a child.

GIL

Oops. (Flicking lighter) Outlasts anyone. Whatever scourged us best be universe-length and terribly following through on its lingerie. Little Aigner, why are we so far less than our groceries? (Claps him against the wall) The twentieth century quit our wallowing in because. See the batch that sagged its bowel? Everyone’s ten ton sacrifice contributed the bidet. Bang, I was thronging the squad, scooting falderal, finicky up my clay. Ready a mass shooter. Our vicar draped in news. Got your cum-caught hosanna for munitions. (Whaps forehead) This is America. We’re especially asleep through our corpse. I pick my wet dreams over anybody’s peace. The squabble whupped by carts. Who will count their flab to know? The shush and clop. How coochies rile. Rile, coochies. We do the bank’s nostalgia. Procreate them stamps, bitch. Proud about the bible. Open just the same. Terminal chamber pots for laundry. Or working class chroma. Loutish wiggard diner fiendings. No handouts for anyone this disguised. Impute left or right prepuce? Goons in the coma of our daughter. No, rather, college-drill the stroller about proletariat whatnot. Marx-fetish, crawling the umpteenth sphincter for lawyerly academic boiler plate argument intellectual hunky-dory snark professorships. Ah, spiffy. Ah, shone best for last. Yuppie entitlement. Marathon winners. Clout of Whole Foods enema gassing uppity. You survived a million proms. So crowded with baby wipe compassion the piety there could outlast any blue ribbon sadist. I hate you all and am no more than you. Except my hate scores bottommost. Disgorge all faculties, sexy. Analysis is the shutout scratch we poll like a Möbius strip. Let’s keep getting pregnant, kid. Beg your clot replenished from every status, every swole roid hydroplaning its apparel. No fucking success starts by breathing.

Edmund enters, oil-slicked, holding a dipstick for trucks. Pries Gil off.

EDMUND

Little Aigner cares little for your points about the stank outside. But looky hence. No nonsense separates oneself. True how breath stereotypes its user. Wrong from every angle: thus human, thus okay. Why not live as a cinder in it? From what height you’re not deeper in the assist: be evil, not deep. All actions reverb, petrified? Sure, look in my doomed pants without thinking. You lie down to protest planetary rotation. Most of what happens here gives motion a bad name? If people still prance, your hate’s paltry. Cheer up. I suggest pussy. So it can flee. Interpret for its needs, then flee. We’ll hump the best purpose without. I’ll help you sad the right way.

LITTLE AIGNER

Love the girl who leaves till you’re tinier than she, the scissors turning in her voice, depressed a lot. Mauled yourself a god for petty others’ petty takings. You can’t even spit because this girl.

GIL

(Sweating) Edmund, check his fucking oil, please.

EXT. FIELD – NIGHT 

EDMUND

(Wiping blood off dipstick) The future might have less plaque on it. Pinkie swear.

http://www.amazon.com/Gil-Nihilist-Sitcom-Sean-Kilpatrick/dp/1621051048

http://www.powells.com/biblio/1-9781621051046-0

PITCH

Gil’s a misanthropic titillation free of brains, copulating in unpaid rent, obsessed with rubbing yogurt on gals’ riblets, hindered by too much earth, its hostile armchair sociologists, bitching word salads, no contingent advancement, and philanthropy: the most fungal pretention. People initiate petty discord to the tune of instinct, opinion, their own stank procreations, and are not worth saving. We’re banning any development or insight. The three mains are the loveable scoundrels typical of some sitcoms, played here to the full extent of implication for actor and viewer. They avalanche their speech, fight without provocation, process no manners or personal space, detest their shit jobs or shit college, cross-societal haters afflicted by irreverent tantrums, clumped verbal retardation, congested asides, monologic Tourette’s, clumsy dialects, language garage sale, a perpetual static reinstated line to line, the worst wrong the better. Lines spasm through clenched teeth, between bouts of self-harm. Everyone is jounced with Zulawski-level manias. Birth is the enemy, theirs or anyone’s. Always in the background extras riot without explanation. Characters can interchange race to spit on race. Gil and Edmund engage in brief, unplanned physical assaults and dancing mid-sentence. Maybe someone runs up, fellates one of them, decides not to finish. People find Gil, have reasons to read a book against his head. The call to prayer is constant and wetly malfunctioning. Everyone jerks through their blocking. Gil is blank, ugly, abhorrent, a regrettable human quotation mark. Starr’s deadpan attitude is an effected fashion. Even her name promotes irony in its contemporary definition. She’s your petite and self-denying hipster, a goddamn people person. But she can sing. Edmund is a full-blown sociopathic auto mechanic who likes to fuck. Hereby indifferent to their caste, dealt the petted tribes we’re jammed into somehow proud, a status yuppies dearly pet - everyone functional is a yuppie by now – this is a backwards lecture, pissing its pants.

Ideal theme song: Death Grips – World of Dogs. Shot [adult swim] length, YouTube backdrops, cardboard budget.

Covers - Matthew Revert / Art - Sam Pink